Training Pathway

General Practice


The General Practitioner training programme is four years in duration, the first two years spent primarily in hospital settings, with third and fourth year in supervised general practice.

Duration & Organisation of Training

There are 14 training schemes in general practice:

  • Ballinasloe Specialist Training Scheme for General Practice
  • Cork Specialist Training Scheme for General Practice
  • Donegal Specialist Training Scheme in General Practice
  • North Dublin Inner City Specialist Training Scheme in General Practice
  • HSE Dublin Mid Leinster Specialist Training Scheme in General Practice
  • HSE South East General Practice Training Scheme
  • Mid Leinster Specialist Training Scheme in General Practice
  • Mid-West Specialist Training Scheme in General Practice
  • North Eastern Regional Training Scheme in General Practice
  • RCSI/Dublin North East General Practice Training Scheme
  • Sligo Specialist Training Scheme in General Practice
  • South West Specialist Training Scheme in General Practice
  • TCD/HSE Specialist Training Scheme in General Practice
  • Western Training Scheme in General Practice

Type of Work

A general practitioner is a medical graduate who gives personal, primary, and continuing care to individuals, families and a practice population, irrespective of age, gender and illness; it is the synthesis of these functions which is unique. A GP will:

  • Attend patients in consulting rooms, in patients’ homes and sometimes in clinics/hospital settings. Their aim is to make early diagnosis.
  • Include and integrate physical, psychological, and social factors in their considerations about health and illness. This will be expressed in their care of patients.
  • Make an initial decision about every problem which is presented to them as a doctor.
  • Undertake the continuing treatment of patients which chronic, recurrent, or terminal illness. Prolonged contact means that the GP can use repeated opportunities to gather information at a pace appropriate to each patient and build up a relationship of trust, which can be used professionally.
  • Practice in co-operation with other colleagues, medical and non-medical.
  • Know when and how to intervene through treatment, prevention and education, to promote the health of patients and their families.
  • Recognise that they also have a professional responsibility to the community

Parallel with training, four modules of the MICGP Examination must be undertaken. These modules are usually spread over the training period.

Read more information about the ICGP training schemes

 exams

 

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